Young Heroes

Song written by Ricky and Marty Wilde. Fourth track of the album Kim Wilde. The track was also included in the soundtrack of the movie She Come from the Woods (2023).

Formats

The track was released as a 7″ single in Peru and a flexi disc in Russia.
See also this page in the discography.

Live performances

‘Young heroes’ was performed live during the Rage to Rock Tour in 1985.

Cover versions

This track was covered by the cast of the television series Fame.

Marty about ‘Young heroes’

‘Young heroes’ was written specifically again for young people. It’s a kind of light rebellious song. The kids today are like the kids of any young generation: they are the young heroes and we think the song explains that. We had a few problems with Kim’s vocals because the actual melody line on it is such that in some parts it is very, very high and in others it’s very, very low.

Interview source

Kim Wilde Fanclub Introductory Magazine


Lyrics

Everyone round keeps putting us down, let it go
It’s the same old play in a grown up day
It’s a stinging sensation
Hanging round on every corner
Where, all the young kids I know want to be

We only wanna stay young, we only wanna be free
He doesn’t wanna be you, she doesn’t wanna be me
We’re all young heroes
We’re all young heroes

Shouted down pushed and we’re gettin’ real bushed
Just have your say and we’ll do it your way
If it makes you fell better
Nothing much to add to what I say
’cause I know just how it fells to be

We only wanna stay young, we only wanna be free
He doesn’t wanna be you, she doesn’t wanna be me
We’re all young heroes
We’re all young heroes

We only wanna be free

You’ll Never Be So Wrong

Song written by Ricky and Marty Wilde. Eighth track of the album Kim Wilde.
Also recorded by the band Hot Chocolate and released as a single by them. Kim’s recording was included on her debut album.

Live performances

‘You’ll Never Be So Wrong’ was performed live during the Debut Tour in 1982, the Catch Tour in 1983, the German tour in December 1992, the Perfect Girl tour in 2007 and the Dutch tour in November 2017.

Cover versions

‘You’ll Never Be So Wrong’ was covered by Neale Jackson.

Marty about ‘You’ll Never Be So Wrong’

After Chequered love had been accepted by Mickie he said: “Right, we need a B-side, you’d better go and write one.” We then wrote ‘You’ll Never Be So Wrong’ and it came in about an hour and a half, so we recorded it and it turned out pretty good. We took the track to Mickie and after he’d listened to it a couple of times he said it was too good to be a B-side and would like to have a crack at it with Hot Chocolate. He did a fabulous jobn with the song and Errol sang it beautifully. We also thought that Kim did a pretty nifty job on the old vocals. We thought it was the best track she’d ever sung. (1)

Marty Wilde: This song remains one of my clearest and most vivid songwriting memories. As I wrote the lyrics, I seemed to picture the entire scenario in my head – just as if I had been watching a film. The location I saw as France, and I can still visualise the startled look on the waiter’s face as the tearful girl rushed past him out of the cafe and back to her small flat. The song was – and still is – one of my favourites. I hope you like it too. (2)

Interview source

(1) Kim Wilde Fanclub Introductory Magazine
(2) “Solid Gold” CD booklet


Lyrics

Just two lovers in a seedy cafe
Someone’s leaving, the waiter says “Hey, won’t you wait”
Running nowhere, she hides in her room
What he told her had to get out and soon

It’s just a bad affair you’ve had
No need to cry, don’t take it bad
You’ll soon be glad when you’re far apart

You’ll never be so wrong, not for a long time
You’ll never be so wrong, not for a long time
‘Cause I’m never gonna find that feeling again
I’m never gonna find that feeling again

Now she’s breaking but what can she do
Somewhere out there a car disappears out of view
Fumbles somewhere for stale cigarettes
Looks for numbers, the ones she could dial but forgets

No point in you just looking down
No way that you can turn it around
You’ve go to realise you”re free

You’ll never be so wrong, not for a long time
You’ll never be so wrong, not for a long time
‘Cause I’m never gonna find that feeling again
I’m never gonna find that feeling again

No point in you just looking down
No way that you can turn it around
You’ve go to realise you’re free

You’ll never be so wrong, not for a long time
You’ll never be so wrong, not for a long time
‘Cause I’m never gonna find that feeling again
I’m never gonna find that feeling again

Tuning in Tuning On

Song written by Ricky and Marty Wilde. Tenth and last track of the album Kim Wilde.

Live performances

‘Tuning in Tuning On’ was performed live during the Debut Tour in 1982, the Catch Tour in 1983 and the Perfect Girl Tour in 2007.

Marty about ‘Tuning in Tuning On’

Originally, we weren’t going to put this on the album, but there’s been such a lot of interest in this B-side of Kids in America, and Rick gave it such a fantastic riff that it sounded sort of freaky. I said, “Oh you must finish it off, it sounds a very eerie kind of track”. I wasn’t sure of what kind of lyric I’d write but in about an hour I had the title and then thought of a theory I had about sound being alive and not dead. So I wrote the lyrics around this pet theory of mine and later discovered that there is an actual sect of yogi’s in the East who genuinely belive that sounds are alive and live on, so basically I’d like to think that’s true. (1)

Interview source

(1) Kim Wilde Fanclub Introductory Magazine


Lyrics

Cruising ’round there’s a sound with a place to go
Tuning in tuning on like a radio
Fell the sound in your head and you set the seal
I believe it’s a force of the life you feel – Tuning on

Do you know what the sounds that you hear will find
Reach to space to the stars and another time
I believe that they search like a seed to grow
In the end it’s the same anyway you go

I really can’t explain
I really can’t explain

Crashing out for the last and the final time
Could a sound and a soul travel on combined
From the womb to the end is it everywhere
Feel the beat of my heart and you know it’s there

I really can’t explain

SPOKEN:
I really believe that sound reaches infinity, do you know what I mean. I think it goes on and on forever, and if that’s true and it was linked to the spiritual side of your lives, well, then sounds could be alive. And it’s part of us and not just something that was dead, but actually alive. Can you imagine the possibilities for the future ? Linking the soul and the sound and then being able to make a giant spiritual musical machine, actually a part of us and not just something you hear – it’s fantastic – it’s just fantastic

I really can’t explain

Our town

Song written by Ricky and Marty Wilde. Second track of the album Kim Wilde.

Live performances

‘Our town’ was performed live during the Debut Tour in 1982 only.

Marty about ‘Our town’

We put this track down and, with all the synthesizers on, it just sounded like a city song. It’s written for the kid who lives in an area he should really get out of. So many youngsters in this generation are crowded into badly designed housing schemes – and when old enough to be independent, they should get out into the world and explore. If our song influences young people to think about that possibility, then the song succeeds. (1)

Interview source

(1) The official fan club for Kim Wilde: Introductory magazine, 1981


Lyrics

This is our town, this is my place
This is where my whole world is lived in
Nothing much, and just out of reach of all the city lights
It’s a high town, it’s a low town
It’s get here, come on you grow town
No-one does, but everyone thinks they’re gonna make it soon

This is one place I respected
Now I feel it’s really dejected
No-one cares and the people just stare
And a man on the box says
“Hey you, don’t walk away, vote for me
You’ll get more pay, keep working hard”
But they work slow

Here it comes now, Sunday morning
Just another sleepy town yawning
Down below everything looks just like another day
But, in the warm glow of the sunrise
There’s a child who’s searching with young eyes
Looking ’round and feeling inside he’s gonna fly away

There was one time I was leaving
But the folks around me kept grieving
Friends said go, but my dad said no
And my mum kept saying
“Don’t go, don’t go away – don’t leave us
You’ve got to stay – just raise them kids”
Oh mother no

No prospects, just projects
Don’t try to tell me we’re living
There’s no real need to try
Can’t you see this town gonna die

Hail the new age, it’s a rat cage
Join the place for breeding dumb spieces
All stacked up and doing whatever someone tells them to
Burn the place down, make it dead ground
Show the people just what they’re missing
Wake up, wake up, can’t you believe in what I’m telling you

There’s the house where I was born in
Now it’s changed without any warning
Cranes just crash and bricks just smash
While a billboard’s saying
“Let’s go, let’s get away – come fly me
You’ve weeks to pay – when sunshine calls”
But I won’t go

This is our town

Kim Wilde (album)

Kim’s self-titled debut album, released in July 1981. After the highly successful single Kids in America the album needed to be completed in a short space of time. With two more hits, Chequered Love and Water on Glass taken off the album, it was Kim’s most successful album for some years.

Music

Marty and Ricky were responsible for writing all of the songs on the album. Most of the music on this album was performed by The Enid.
Musically, the album was mainly rock-oriented, which wasn’t surprising given the appearance of The Enid, but it also featured a reggae track (Everything We Know) and a brass section appeared on 2 6 5 8 0. Lyrically, Marty Wilde provided a few surprises: besides the obligatory love songs there was also a song about a rare minority of people who suffer from tinnitus (Water on Glass), the deterioration of inner cities (Our Town) and a song about a theory that sound is alive (Tuning in Tuning on).
The album was produced by Ricky Wilde.

Tracks

This album contains the tracks Water on Glass, Our Town, Everything We Know, Young Heroes, Kids in America, Chequered Love, 2 6 5 8 0, You’ll Never Be So Wrong, Falling Out, Tuning in Tuning on. In Korea, the tracks ‘Our town’ and ‘2 6 5 8 0’ were dropped from the album.

Artwork

The album sleeve featured not only Kim, but also her band, which consisted of Calvin Hayes, James Stevenson and Ricky Wilde.
Photography was done by Gered Mankowitz.

Formats

‘Kim Wilde’ was originally released on LP and tape. In 1988, it was also released on cd.
See this page in the discography.
In 2009, the cd was re-released by Cherry Pop records with new liner notes written by Steve Thorpe and a handful of bonus tracks.
See this page in the discography.
A deluxe edition of the album was released in 2020, with liner notes by Marcel Rijs and several previously unreleased remixes.
See this page in the discography.

Chart performance

After its release it entered the British albums chart at no. 10, moving to number three the next week. The album was also successful in other countries.

Germany: 1 (31 weeks)
Netherlands: 2 (14 weeks)
Sweden: 1 (30 weeks)
United Kingdom: 3 (14 weeks)
United States: 86


Kids in America

Song written by Ricky and Marty Wilde.
The song was recorded in 1980 after RAK Records boss Mickie Most heard Wilde singing on a backing track for her brother Ricky Wilde (most probably Tearaway). He liked her voice and image and expressed an interest to work with her. Ricky Wilde, together with his father Marty wrote the song ‘Kids in America’ for Kim to record, using a WASP synthesizer. Ricky later stated that the main synth line was inspired by that of Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark’s ‘Messages’. He recorded a demo with Kim at The Lodge, produced together with Steve Stewart of The Enid. They went into the studio with everything except the words to the chorus, which Marty Wilde, who was responsible for writing the lyrics to the song, came up with at the last minute. The line “Whoah-oh!”, which is sung after the song’s title lyrics, was originally meant to be a guitar lick or a brass stab, but sounded much better sung by the male backing vocals, according to Marty. Most heard the demo and decided to remix the track himself. He released it on RAK as Wilde’s first single in January 1981. Later it appeared as track 5 on Kim’s debut album Kim Wilde.

The single, released on 26 January 1981, was an immediate hit, peaking at number 2 on the UK singles chart. It sold over 2 million copies worldwide. The following year it became a Top 30 hit in the US. In the summer of 1981, the track appeared on Wilde’s self-titled debut album.

In 2005, the song was included in the soundtrack album of the movie Daltry Calhoun. In 2023 the song appeared on the soundtrack of the movie She Came from the Woods.

Versions

In 1994, several remixes of the track were released as Kids in America 1994. The compilation album The Remix Collection, released the same year, included the Maranza mix of ‘Kids in America’.
In 2001, a remix entitled ‘Bright lights remix’ was released on The Very Best of Kim Wilde.
In 2006, Kim included a new version called Kids in America (2006) on her album Never Say Never.
In 2007, a live version of ‘Kids in America’ was released on the cd-single Baby Obey Me. This live version was recorded on 21 February 2007 at Ancienne Belgique, Brussels (Belgium).
A live version recorded during the UK live tour was included in the deluxe edition of Here Come the Aliens in 2018 and on Aliens Live in 2019.
In 2020, Cherry Pop released five new remixes: Luke Mornay Remix, Luke Mornay Instrumental, Popfidelity Allstars remix, Popfidelity Allstars instrumental and the Neutrophic remix.

Formats

In the UK and America, the single was only released on 7″ format. However, in Germany a 12″ single was also made and distributed around Europe. This 12″ single contained no special versions, it contained the same tracks as the 7″ single.
See also this page in the discography.

Music video

A music video was filmed to promote the single. It was directed by Brian Grant.
Go to this page for more information.

Live performances

‘Kids in America’ was performed live on each and every live concert by Kim Wilde since her Debut Tour in 1982.

Cover versions

‘Kids in America’ has been covered by 80 Caliber, Aequivox, Aje’h, Aksons, Alchemy, All Right Tokyo, Alvin and the Chipmunks, American Juniors, The Anchor, Billy Joe Armstrong, Atombuzz, Atomic Kitten, Audia, Back beach all stars, Bad Biscut, the Bam Bams, The Baseballs, Beat Crusaders, Beautiful Boy, Big-Box Store, BIIANCO, Bitch Alert, Malin Björkman, Blonde Electra, Bloodhound Gang, Bouncing souls, Brewed & bottled, Brokken Roses, Bronnie, Carne de Puta, Cascada, Catch 22, Chaos Engine, Chilli and the Peanuts, CineMuerte, Corporate Christ, Cover Up, Born Crain, DJ Boonie, Dr. & the Medics, Patrick Daly, Darling Waste, DeadraveN, Dedeepedoodah, Disco Express, Dizel, the Donnas, Dan Dryers, Tom Duke & Gronaerten, Effcee, EiRR0R, Electric Six, Sophie Ellis-Bextor, Energy Function Band, Euphrasia, Foo Fighters, Fourth grade nothing, GAD ’80, Ghoul, Gino Marinello Orchestra, Gonzo, Good Kitty, Grzegorz, Guter, the Happy Revolvers, the Harvard Din & Tonics, Andrew Howie, Joshua Dumas and Katy Albert, Charlotte Hatherley, Hiddys, Hot Stewards, It’s a cover up, Jean-Claude Petit Orchestra, Jive Bunny & the Mastermixers, Kick, Kim, Kim-Lian, Kizooks, Nicolette Knight, Lawnmower Deth, the Larks, Lyane Leigh, Len, Liquid Lava, Local Oafs, the Lollies, Lolly, Los Angeles de Tute, L’uke, LVCRFT, Malin, Marsha, Javier Martinez Maya, Mickey Trump, Minipops, Morella’s Forest, the Motorettes, the Muffs, MxPx, Naked Aggression, Nasty Habits, Night Shift Band, Nirvana, No Label, No Secrets, NOFX, The Omega Point, One Coin, One Direction, Orange Sector, Orko, Plunk, Radio Wendy, Radspitz, Richard Romance Sythesizer Section, Rockhouse Brothers, de Romeo’s, Room full of strangers, Rubbish, Rude Boy George, Runway MMC, John Rushton, Saws ‘n’ Squares, S.E.X. Appeal, Shebang, Silence, Sixteen Deluxe, Snake Eye, Sylvio de Silver, Sômbre, Strawberry Slaughterhouse, Sugar Beats, Lynn Sweet, Tasty, Terminus City, Terremoto Party, That Eighties Band, Them Sluts, Taivalkunta Beat, Tiffany, Tin Lizzy, Tři Sestry, The Twang, Ursüla, Virgin Suicides, Benjamin Wagner, Sarah Walker, the Wynona Riders, Yohmm and the Young Knives.
There are eight versions of ‘Kids in America’ with different lyrics:

Plus the following versions of ‘Kids in America’ with different lyrics and a different language:

The song is quoted in the track The Art of Losing by American Hi-fi.

Marty Wilde about ‘Kids in America’

This was the song that started Kim off and it’s a very important track. The melody line was written by Rick at our Hertfordshire home and it really came quite quickly, in about half an hour. We originally thought it would be a great title for an album as well as a single and had this vision of the sleeve which would feature a New York skyscraper with Kim’s face in an aura in the background instead of the sun or moon. It was our first hit, written for enjoyment and we were delighted that it got as high as it did. (1)

Mickie Most about ‘Kids in America’

What I heard, immediately, was a hit. The public today is looking for a less polished, slightly do-it-yourself sound in records generally. I knew instinctively that this could be the start of a huge record, and a big career for the girl. (2)

Ricky Wilde about ‘Kids in America’

I wanted to be a singer. I went into a demo studio and recorded a couple of tracks and went into RAK Studios. And Mickie Most came out and heard it and said “Yeah, I like it, but I want this to be recorded with a different producer”. Which I wasn’t too happy about. So I said “Yeah, okay, I’ll do it”, cause it was a record deal. So I went in there, recorded these couple of songs and I said to the guy who was producing me, a guy called Steve, I said, “Steve, it is alright if I bring my sister in to do backing vocals?”. He says, “Yeah, fine, bring her in”. So Kim came in and started singing. When she was singing Mickie Most came in and said “She looks good. I like her voice as well, maybe we can do something with her”, and he walked out.
And then Steve looks at me and said, “Yeah, maybe I can produce something with Kim as well”. And I thought, “Hang on a minute… I’m not sure about this”. So that’s when I went home that night, wrote ‘Kids in America’, booked two days studio time in a separate studio, recorded it with Kim, then went back to Mickie and said, “Look, this is a song with Kim that I produced, what do you think of it?”, and he thought it was a smash. Then it became priority over my stuff. (3)

Kim about ‘Kids in America’

I knew it was a hit, and within a month it had been remixed here, in Mickie Most’s studio. The record was all quick-quick-quick. Ricky and my father wrote it quite quickly, it was demo’d quickly, mixed quickly, and went up the chart quickly. That’s the way I like pop music to be: write a good song, sing it, and get on with the next before there’s time to think about it too much. (4)

I still like my song Kids in America. I’m just waiting for one of tese new bands to cover it. Someone like Jesus And Chain Mary Gang, whatever it’s called… Jesus And Main (bursts into hysterical laughter and puts on a granny voice)… what’s that new-fangled pop band called, the one that all the young people like these days…?! (5)

That’s the fun about music: it should wind people up a bit. I mean, “Kids in America” really wound people up. It was such an infectious song that people really hated liking it. It was sung by an English girl whose father had written the lyrics and whose brother had produced it. And it was on RAK Records to boot. “From New York to East California…” Where the hell’s that? I still don’t know! And everybody loved it.

When it was a hit in America, they were like, ‘Why ‘East California’? Why not all the way over to the west? Why miss out on that whole section of California that’s not mentioned in the song?’ And I said, ‘Well, they already got it. The people from the west side have already got it. We just had to bring it over to the east.’ I was finding myself trying to come up with any excuse as to why my dad might have written ‘East California’, and if you ask him, quite disarmingly, he’ll just say, ‘Cause it sounded better’. (6)

It’s strange to have any feelings about that one any more, because I’ve been asked about it relentlessly for 13 years. I still really enjoy performing it. It’s easy to like ‘Kids In America’ because everybody else loves it. I can see that it’s a classic song, which explains why there’s the interest in remixing it again. I can’t say that about every record I’ve released, but I think I can say that about ‘Kids In America’. (7)

I did hear the one by Lawnmower Deth. They have made a trashmental-version. And there’s a horrific version in the movie Clueless. It’s really horrible. But I like that the song comes up every now and again. It doesn’t surprise me, because it was such an enormous hit. And everyone still likes the song. (8)

Highest chart positions

Australia: 2
Austria: 12
Belgium: 4
Canada: 34
France: 3
Germany: 5 (32 weeks)
Ireland: 2 (9 weeks)
Netherlands: 6 (13 weeks)
New Zealand: 5
Norway: 9
South Africa: 1
Sweden: 2 (18 weeks)
Switzerland: 5 (11 weeks)
United Kingdom: 2 (13 weeks)
United States: 25 (18 weeks)

Interview sources:
(1) Kim Wilde Fanclub Introductory Magazine
(2) Kim Wilde taking different route to top : Word-of-mouth, Personal Promotions, Not Live Shows build sales, Billboard (USA), 19 September 1981
(3) Frequenstar, M6 (France), 5 October 1992
(4) The Wilde side of Kim, Melody Maker (UK), 11 April 1981
(5) Miss Heartache, Frontline (UK), 1988
(6) Mad World (book), 2014
(7) Kim Wilde, Record Collector (UK), September 1993
(8) ‘I don’t talk about my lovelife, not even for money’, Aktueel (Netherlands), 1995


Lyrics

Looking out a dirty old window
Down below the cars in the city go rushing by
I sit here alone
And I wonder why

Friday night and everyone’s moving
I can feel the heat but it’s shooting
Heading down
I search for the beat in this dirty town

Down town, the young ones are going
Down town, the young ones are growing

We’re the kids in America – woh-oh
We’re the kids in America – woh-oh
Everybody live for the music-go-round

Bright lights the music gets faster
Look boy, don’t check on your watch
Not another glance
I’m not leaving now, honey not a chance

Hot-shot, give me no problems
Much later baby you’ll be saying never mind
You know life is cruel, life is never kind

Kind hearts don’t make a new story
Kind hearts don’t grab any glory

We’re the kids in America
We’re the kids in America
Everybody live for the music-go-round

Come closer, honey that’s better
Got to get a brand new experience
Feeling right
Oh don’t try to stop, baby, hold me tight

Outside a new day is dawning
Outside Sububia’s sprawling everywhere
I don’t want to go baby

New York to East California
There’s a new wave coming I warn ya

We’re the kids in America
We’re the kids in America
Everybody live for the music-go-round

We’re the kids
We’re the kids
We’re the kids in America

Falling Out

Song written by Ricky Wilde. Ninth track of the album Kim Wilde.

In a roundabout way, this was responsible for the beginning of Kim’s career. Marty had booked a studio in Luton to record a Country album, a little 8-track studio. He had to go to London urgently to record a TV show and said to Rick, “Look, I’ve got to go but the studio’s been paid for so I’ll leave it to you, you can put the track down while I’m gone.”

Live performances

‘Falling out’ was performed live during the Debut Tour in 1982 only.

Marty about ‘Falling out’

I’ll always remember walking up the stairs of the studio on my return and hearing this fantastic song coming out. I couldn’t believe it. It was the first song that Ricky had ever written and when he’d recorded it, it turned out better than he’d though and we did it with another track called ‘Tearaway’. That turned out well and Rick took them around to a few studios and got a good reaction from RAK, who said they liked the tracks. So Ricky went to RAK and started recording ‘Tearaway’ because he thought it would be a good single with ‘Falling Out’ as a probable B-side. He asked Mickie if it was alright to put Kim on backing vocals of ‘Falling out’ and he said “yes”. When she did the backing vocals, Mickie came in and heard her and he said that he thought she had a good voice and good image and could do something with her. Her career started with this number ‘Falling out’ and soon after, about a month later, we went into the studio and began recording ‘Kids in America’ and it’s gone on from there. (1)

Interview source

(1) Kim Wilde Fanclub Introductory Magazine, 1981


Lyrics

What can I say now after all is said and done
You cut me up in pieces when the shooting first begun
What did I do to you to make you turn away
’cause now there’s nothing left for me
There’s nothing I can say

Now it’s too late you feeling sorry
You’ll never change
And there’s nothing you can do about it

Falling out – why did you do it to me, yeah
Falling out – cutting me up into pieces
Falling out – you know that you upset me, yeah
Falling out – you know that I’m so hurt baby

You said you loved me, I believed you for a while
You sure could fool the angels
When you use that painted smile
I should have known that it was too good to be true
But now that it’s all over, you know I won’t forget you

Now it’s too late you feeling sorry
You’ll never change
And there’s nothing you can do about it

Falling out – why did you do it to me, yeah
Falling out – cutting me up into pieces
Falling out – you know that you upset me, yeah
Falling out – you know that I’m so hurt baby

So now it’s over and there’s nothing left to say
The flame that burned within my heart
Now slowly fades away
So don’t you ever think of knocking at my door
Just turn the light out, close your eyes
And think of me no more

And it’s too late to say you’re sorry
You’ll never change
And there’s nothing you can do about it

Falling out – why did you do it to me, yeah
Falling out – cutting me up into pieces
Falling out – you know that you upset me, yeah
Falling out – you know that I’m so hurt baby

Everything We Know

Song written by Ricky and Marty Wilde. Third track of the album Kim Wilde.

Live performances

‘Everything We Know’ was performed live during the Debut Tour in 1982 only.

Marty about ‘Everything We Know’

This was written while we were up in a hotel in Scotland. Rick had a reggae chord sequence and melody and it sounded great, so everything fitted in pretty quickly, Rick also came up with the title. The kind of song we wanted to make is…. If you were on a beach somewhere nice on holiday and heard the track while you were drinking something or other and watching the sun go down… well, it was that sort of feeling. A kind of lazy reggae summer song. (1)

Interview source

(1) Kim Wilde Fanclub Introductory Magazine, 1981


Lyrics

Don’t bring your gun ’round here
Don’t need you mouthing off your fear
It touches all you can build a wall
We all have tasted tears

Everything we know
Everything we know
Everything we know
Everywhere we go

We walked along the beach
Once lovers now we’re out of reach
Windy skies, they kissed me goodbye
It takes experience to teach

Everything we know
Everything we know
Everything we know
Everywhere we go

Nobody laughed today
I went to watch the children play
Their smiles and mine were frozen in time
I’ll just remember them that way

Everything we know
Everything we know
Everything we know
Everywhere we go

2 6 5 8 0

Song written by Ricky and Marty Wilde. Seventh track of the album Kim Wilde. The music has a slight ‘party’ feel and is embellished with a horn section. It’s a track that is very untypical for Kim Wilde’s whole oeuvre.

Live performances

‘2 6 5 8 0’ was performed live during the Debut Tour in 1982 and the Catch Tour in 1983.

Ricky about ‘2 6 5 8 0’

This was also written in Scotland, within about an hour, although the lyrics took a long time to write. But the actual feel of the song, the way it went, came immediately. Marty just made up some figures and came up with the number 26580 and it sounded good. It’s basically meant to be a cheeky song… ‘tongue-in-cheek’. (1)

Kim about ‘2 6 5 8 0’

Like ‘2 6 5 8 0’ off the LP, when my dad gave me the lyric for that I sort of looked at him and l thought my God – what is in his brain! There are parts of him I didn’t even know about! But, you see, he’s got this sense of humour. (2)

Interview sources

(1) Kim Wilde Fanclub Introductory Magazine
(2) WILDE: Sex kitten or reluctant starlet?, New Musical Express (UK), 19 September 1981


Lyrics

I watch a man sitting down in the park
The flashy suit manufactured by the makers
He’s got a pen and he circles an add
It makes him laugh ‘cos he’s reading dirty papers

2 6 5 8 0

She doesn’t know but she’s getting his call
He’s talking straight but he wants it in a strange way
She combs her hair doesn’t worry at all
He could be mad but its just another payday

2 6 5 8 0, 2 6 5 8 0, 2 6 5 8 0
Oh, dial it if you want to know me

She likes to live on the poor side of town
She’s shacking down with a guy from West Guyana
The boys around always look at the ground
Oh, what they’d give for a night with that piranha

2 6 5 8 0, 2 6 5 8 0, 2 6 5 8 0
Oh, dial it if you want to know me

She doesn’t have to make her money that way
She’s such a pretty young girl
I guess they love it ‘cos you hear when they stay
They’re cryin’ oh, oh, oh

This guy arrives looking scared as a rat
He needs her love but he wants it like a brother
Three hours later he crawls out on his knees
She’s laughing loud ‘cos he’s calling for his mother

2 6 5 8 0, 2 6 5 8 0, 2 6 5 8 0
Oh, dial it if you want to know me

2 6 5 8 0, 2 6 5 8 0, 2 6 5 8 0
Oh, dial it if you want to know me